Assistive Technologies for READING (with your ears)!!!!!

There are some truly amazing technologies out there to help a person READ (or in my case, to HEAR-read).

I want to share a couple of my searches with you guys.


  1. First of all, there is the smart phone voice itself. I can only describe this from the perspective of an iPhone user — but it is quite easy with the iPhone. Settings > General > Accessibility > Speech > And you will find all sorts of wonderful options here!! You can turn on features to speak highlighted text to you, and/or you can turn on a “2-fingered swipe” down from the top of your phone screen to automatically read aloud whatever text is on your screen!! (I LOVE IT.) And most importantly, to me, you can adjust the speed of the voice, and the gender, and even the accent they use! Personally, I find the male voice for U.K. English the least distracting/easiest to follow for me.
    When I 2-finger-swipe down from the top of the screen, a very easy menu pops up so I can adjust the speed of the reading even while it’s reading to me. I can also pause and rewind and such. Fabulous invention.


  2. Next up, I have only tried a couple of apps so far that will READ ALOUD whatever text you happen to have laying around!!! Say you are trying to read a book — you can just use your smartphone, open up this app (my favorite so far is called TurboScannerOCR), and use it to snap a picture of the book page. Then you have the option of adjust the boundaries of the page you want read (for example, maybe you only want a single paragraph read to you, not the whole thing). Then you click OCR on the app, and it turns the picture into text — editable, savable, READ-ALOUD-ABLE words. I am then just 2-finger-swiping down my screen and voilà! It’s all read aloud to me!!!!! I LOVE IT!!!!!

    This app is FREE and you don’t have to upgrade to use it!!! I personally did pay $2.99 to remove the ads, however, because I love the app so much. I am planning on using it to read aloud any part of my upcoming textbooks that I will need help getting through this semester!!!


  3. This one doesn’t count — it’s not for ear reading. But I want to mention this here really quickly anyway. There are other devices that can help. I wish I’d had this in grade school — I have the “Rivers” reading disorder and this would have been SO wonderful. As it was, I improvised for myself eventually by using a sheet of paper above and below the line of text I was reading. But look at this! Too perfect! And actually, I would still find this useful today. I usually get lazy and use my own hand to block text below the line I’m reading, but this is fabulous and colored layouts are supposed to be useful for some people. This one’s about $20.

    They do come in other colors from other companies, however, and some are only a few dollars (but do not block as much text). There are many options out there — even colored tapes that you can lay down to make your own sort of line highlights as you read.


  4. The Intel Reader, sometimes marketed for people with Dyslexia but also good for other vision/reading issues, looks fabulous. It’s is the most portable I’ve found of these types of devices. It basically snapshots your paper, book page, whatever, turns it to text, and reads it to you. It also displays it on the screen and you can increase the font size or whatever you need to do. This picture doesn’t show how small and basically awesome it is. I watched a video on it in use and it’s pretty amazing. BUUUT it’s going to run you at LEAST $500.


  5. Reading pens. These look just super cool, and SO portable and usable. I’m hesitant to buy one, however, just because it’s only able to “read” the line you’re scanning, obviously. I can’t imagine wanting to go over every line of my textbook like this. I wanted something that can snapshot the whole page and read it aloud to me. But for smaller things or daily things, wouldn’t this be awesome??? I think they’re going to run you like $200. Of course, these have really cool features, like you can look up a word you don’t understand right then and there. It is a dictionary and can give synonyms and all kinds of neato stuff! Some can translate English to Spanish. I’m not sure about other languages.


  6. Now for the ones I wish I could afford because they’d be so EEAASSYY to use once set up!!!!! I mean, check this sucker out. Just set down your book and boom. Text to speech (and magnified or highlighted text on the screen, if you wish to eye-read along). And BOOM, minimum $1700, sometimes MORE.There are other devices along this same line, but they’re all very expensive like this one.

So that’s my list for today!!!!! I think this covers the basic gist of the assistive technologies that I would personally find really useful and great. ENJOY!!!!!

Reading Part 2: Floaters in Eye and a bonus topic

Floaters like my non-irritating ones, from site veniceeyedoctors.com

Floaters like my non-irritating ones, from site veniceeyedoctors.com

Another distraction for reading was that I have a lot of floaters in my eyes, particularly my right eye. 99% of them do not bother me. I am fine with them. In fact, I used to play games with them in elementary school. When I had insomnia for hours, I’d have my nightlight on and would “flick” my floaters all the way up and let them glide downward. FLICK, glide downward. FLICK, glide downward. I’m easily entertained. (This is prior to OCD poster counting at night.)

But one of them is not the normal type. It is a large, solid black dot about the size of the head of a nail when focused on a sheet of paper in front of me.

It is large enough and solid enough that it covers up words when I am reading sometimes. I’ve had it for literally as long as I can remember. It used to be terribly distracting because obviously it moves around on the page as my eyes are trying to read, plus it can cover up important letters or words sometimes.

Okay, BONUS TOPIC time. I didn’t know what to call this, in other words.

In middle school, my room was arranged such that if I tried to read in bed, I couldn’t see the page I was trying to read because my lamp light struck my eye in just a way that all I could see were the veins in my eye. My parents didn’t believe me. I was finally able to discuss it with an eye doctor and learn that I was not hallucinating or anything — I’m just sensitive and indeed the light can easily strike my eye in such a way that I can’t see the real world, just the blood vessels and such in my eye.

I’m having trouble locating any Internet images that show what I mean BUT YOU CAN TRY IT FOR YOURSELF. This video shows you how to see your own network of blood vessels in a small amount very easily (and starts out completely fascinating to boot):
http://gizmodo.com/5872157/freakythis-simple-trick-lets-you-see-the-blood-vessels-in-your-eye